TAHMO

Introduction to TAHMO by John Selker and Nick van de Giesen

Signing MoU between Kenya Meteorological Service and TAHMO by John Selker (left) amd Nick van de Giesen (middle).

Welcome to the TAHMO Newsletter!  This is our way of bringing the TAHMO community up-to-date with our progress, and to let you know about neat opportunities to get involved with the TAHMO program.

As you will read in this newsletter, TAHMO recently passed a major milestone as we moved from simply being a happy group of committed members to a funded program!  The Securing Water For Food initiative is a joint effort of the aid agencies of the USA, Netherlands, and Sweden to identify high-impact business opportunities to use water more efficiently in the developing world.  There were 520 applicants to this program, and after a rigorous selection process, TAHMO was selected as one of the 17 funded programs.  Beyond the obvious importance of this financial support (paying for much of the salaries of our East African team and investment in 150 stations over 3 years), our selection was a great honor, and will add significant credibility to our mission and team.

TAHMO recently had several other major advancements.  The Netherlands Science Foundation (NWO/WOTRO) has chosen to fund the installation of 30 TAHMO stations in Ghana, forming the basis of TAHMO West Africa.  NASA has funded the installation of a network of TAHMO stations around Lake Chad (to be installed in February by Dr. Selker), Earth Networks is funding installations around Lake Victoria, and many more installations across Africa are currently in discussion.  A very successful TAHMO workshop took place in Akure, Nigeria, organized by the TAHMO team at the Federal University of Technology Akure (FUTA). At the same time, the TAHMO School-2-School program is gaining momentum, with the first pair of schools now collecting data in Kenya and Idaho, USA.

As always, we are absolutely committed to the success of TAHMO’s mission to develop a sustainable network of climatic observation stations across Africa.  We are pleased with our progress, but have a long road ahead.  We deeply appreciate your interest and assistance!

 
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